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 We offer   

MOLD TESTING

         &  MOLD             REMEDIATION   SERVICES 

 Florida Licensed Mold Remediators and Testing Company

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As a Licensed Mold contractor in SW Florida we follow the National Organization of Remediators and Testing, with protocols to ensure the best remediation for your home or business. Our Mold cleaning process includes free inspections and protocols, scopes of work, finding the source first and foremost, insurance handling as our Licensed Inspectors and Estimator's background includes FL Insurance Adjusting.

 

As you can see, we are an all in one service provider to make remediating of your home or business as stress less as possible. 

Mold Cleaning services we provide include:

Free Inspections, Air Quality Mold testing,  

 Your home or office remediation, Its contents, furniture, Clean sanitize and dry clean Laundry, Moving, Packing and Unpacking, Ozone Chambers, UV light systems, testing, clearance PRV'S and so much more.       

 

 Water, Fire, Mold, Bio Hazard Restoration 

As licensed Mold Remediators and Mold Inspectors we offer the best services for restoring  your home or business from any disaster or loss.

 

We also restore, save, and clean your Hard & Soft Contents, Clothes, Offer full Pack-outs, Moving & Onsite Storage 

 

Restoring What Matters. 

      Residential & Commercial Remediation Services 

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FLORIDA LICENSE MRSA2651 | MRSR2866 

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Common Questions and Answers Regarding Mold. 

I heard about “toxic molds” and “black molds” that grow in homes and other buildings. Should I be concerned?

 

 There is always a little mold everywhere – in the air and on many surfaces.

Certain molds are toxigenic, meaning they can produce toxins (specifically “mycotoxins”). Hazards presented by molds that may produce mycotoxins should be considered the same as other common molds which can grow in your house. Not all fungi produce mycotoxins and even those that do will not do so under all surface or environmental conditions.

 

Mold growth, which often looks like spots, can be many different colors, and can smell musty.  Color is not an indication of how dangerous a mold may be.  Any mold should be removed and the moisture source that helped it grow should be removed.

The EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) warns, “Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins).” and, “Molds gradually destroy the things they grow on.

Common forms as Aspergillus, Cladosporium and Penicillium and the more uncommon and dangerous molds as Stachybotrys, also known as “Black Mold.

We are Certified IAQ/Mold Inspectors and Certified Mold Remediators in your area who are properly trained in following these protocols. Protocol was developed for mold Remediators to insure the proper remediation of your home or building. Once protocol is completed a mold Post Remediation Verification (PRV) is required for the clearance of your home.   

We specialize in all of the above. We have a professional team that is ready to follow standards and protect and remediate your home and contents.   

(CDC) How common is mold in buildings?

Molds are very common in buildings and homes. Mold will grow in places with a lot of moisture, such as around leaks in roofs, windows, or pipes, or where there has been flooding. Mold grows well on paper products, cardboard, ceiling tiles, and wood products. Mold can also grow in dust, paints, wallpaper, insulation, drywall, carpet, fabric, and upholstery.

The most common indoor molds are Cladosporium, Penicillium, and Aspergillus.  We do not have precise information about how often different molds are found in buildings and homes.

 

How do molds get in the indoor environment and how do they grow?

Mold is found both indoors and outdoors. Mold can enter your home through open doorways, windows, vents, and heating and air conditioning systems. Mold in the air outside can also attach itself to clothing, shoes, and pets can and be carried indoors. When mold spores drop on places where there is excessive moisture, such as where leakage may have occurred in roofs, pipes, walls, plant pots, or where there has been flooding, they will grow. Many building materials provide suitable nutrients that encourage mold to grow. Wet cellulose materials, including paper and paper products, cardboard, ceiling tiles, wood, and wood products, are particularly conducive for the growth of some molds. Other materials such as dust, paints, wallpaper, insulation materials, drywall, carpet, fabric, and upholstery, commonly support mold growth.

How do you know if you have a mold problem?

Large mold infestations can usually be seen or smelled.

How do molds affect people?

Exposure to damp and moldy environments may cause a variety of health effects, or none at all. Some people are sensitive to molds. For these people, exposure to molds can lead to symptoms such as stuffy nose, wheezing, and red or itchy eyes, or skin. Some people, such as those with allergies to molds or with asthma, may have more intense reactions. Severe reactions may occur among workers exposed to large amounts of molds in occupational settings, such as farmers working around moldy hay. Severe reactions may include fever and shortness of breath.

In 2004 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) found there was sufficient evidence to link indoor exposure to mold with upper respiratory tract symptoms, cough, and wheeze in otherwise healthy people; with asthma symptoms in people with asthma; and with hypersensitivity pneumonitis in individuals susceptible to that immune-mediated condition.

In 2009, the World Health Organization issued additional guidance, the WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Dampness and Mould pdf icon[PDF – 2.65 MB]external icon {Summary} pdf icon[PDF – 167 KB]. Other recent studies have suggested a potential link of early mold exposure to development of asthma in some children, particularly among children who may be genetically susceptible to asthma development, and that selected interventions that improve housing conditions can reduce morbidity from asthma and respiratory allergies.

A link between other adverse health effects, such as acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage among infants, memory loss, or lethargy, and molds, including the mold Stachybotrys chartarum  has not been proven. Further studies are needed to find out what causes acute idiopathic hemorrhage and other adverse health effects.

There is no blood test for mold.  Some physicians can do allergy testing for possible allergies to mold, but no clinically proven tests can pinpoint when or where a particular mold exposure took place.

Who is most at risk for health problems associated with exposure to mold?

People with allergies may be more sensitive to molds. People with immune suppression or underlying lung disease are more susceptible to fungal infections. Individuals with chronic respiratory disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, asthma) may experience difficulty breathing. Individuals with immune suppression are at increased risk for infection from molds. If you or your family members have these conditions, a qualified medical clinician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment.

How do you keep mold out of buildings and homes?

Inspect buildings for evidence of water damage and visible mold as part of routine building maintenance, Correct conditions causing mold growth (e.g., water leaks, condensation, infiltration, or flooding) to prevent mold growth.

Inside your home you can control mold growth by:

  • Controlling humidity levels;

  • Promptly fixing leaky roofs, windows, and pipes;

  • Thoroughly cleaning and drying after flooding;

  • Ventilating shower, laundry, and cooking areas.

Specific Recommendations:

  • Keep humidity levels as low as you can—between 30% and 50%–all day long. An air conditioner or dehumidifier will help you keep the level low. Bear in mind that humidity levels change over the course of a day with changes in the moisture in the air and the air temperature, so you will need to check the humidity levels more than once a day.

  • Use an air conditioner or a dehumidifier during humid months.

  • Be sure your home has enough ventilation. Use exhaust fans which vent outside your home in the kitchen and bathroom. Make sure your clothes dryer vents outside your home.

  • Fix any leaks in your home’s roof, walls, or plumbing so mold does not have moisture to grow.

  • Consider not using carpet in rooms or areas like bathrooms or basements that may have a lot of moisture.

 

The 2019 Florida Statutes Regarding licensed Mold Remediators and Mold Assessors

Title XXXII
REGULATION OF PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS

Chapter 468
MISCELLANEOUS PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS

View Entire Chapter

468.8419 Prohibitions; penalties.—(1) A person may not:

(a) Effective July 1, 2011, perform or offer to perform any mold assessment unless the mold assessor has documented training in water, mold, and respiratory protection under s. 468.8414(2).

(b) Effective July 1, 2011, perform or offer to perform any mold assessment unless the person has complied with the provisions of this part.

(c) Use the name or title “certified mold assessor,” “registered mold assessor,” “licensed mold assessor,” “mold assessor,” “professional mold assessor,” or any combination thereof unless the person has complied with the provisions of this part.

(d) Perform or offer to perform any mold remediation to a structure on which the mold assessor or the mold assessor’s company provided a mold assessment within the last 12 months. This paragraph does not apply to a certified contractor who is classified in s. 489.105(3) as a Division I contractor. However, the department may adopt rules requiring that, if such contractor performs the mold assessment and offers to perform the mold remediation, the contract for mold remediation provided to the homeowner discloses that he or she has the right to request competitive bids.